Category Archives: Enlightening Quotes

Be the Man Who Strives for Greatness

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Be the man who endeavours to fullfill his dreams, whether they be of bedding women all over the world, escaping the corporate plantation, or finding financial freedom

This quote from President Theodore Roosevelt encompasses the often tragic, sometimes heroic striving of those souls determined to live a life worth living. A self-directed life that leaves the flock of sheeple behind, striving to turn our lives into a self-creating masterpiece rather than another carbon copy, dime bin facsimile.

We awakened men might fail in our effort to escape the bondage of The Anglo-American Matrix, but it’s far better to be the man who strives for greatness rather than another defeated, bitter corporate Beta male drone living vicariously through the confections of Hollyweird film, boilerplate sitcoms, and online porn.

Those pandering to less than feminine Anglobitches for some attention and a dispassionate roll in the hay. Those forever driving their $40,000 sports car or pickup truck (that they’re in debt for) in a continuous circuit from home to work without ever seizing the possibilities for adventure and discovery that await the imaginative, bold, creative man. Those forever waiting on Friday and the weekend as they enrich someone else’s life at the expense of not living their own. Those forever waiting on two weeks of vacation each year while the other 50 are spent in chains.

These people relish attacking men who step outside the lines. It seems the weak and envious were common even a century ago. Indeed, America has become a Culture of Critique, a culture that discourages originality and encourages groupthink. From Roosevelt’s speech The Man in the Arena:

It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat.

Failure is always a possibility, but so is success. The takeaway lesson is most men never even try to live their own lives. They follow the herd, take orders from their master, follow the preordained life script foisted upon them, then look back on lives of nothing but wasted time and potential after it’s too late to do anything about it.

I was one of those people, before I broke away and started running as hard as I can. I haven’t tripped and fallen yet. I may face-plant tomorrow, but at least I can shut my eyes for the last time someday knowing I gave it hell. I tried. I didn’t accept having my life and potential stolen from me lying down.

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It’s Like He Had a Crystal Ball

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Cameras like these are appearing even on remote Interstate highways…for your own safety, of course. Or is it something else?

We are living in an amalgam of Brave New World, 1984, and Fahrenheit 451 in the West. All three novels are coming to fruition, from the manipulation of reproduction, sexuality, and psychology in Brave New World, to the surveillance state watching every move of its citizens in 1984, to the coming censorship of books and blogs that don’t support the regime’s interests in Fahrenheit 451.

Take this quote from Huxley, author of Brave New World, speaking with Mike Wallace on 60 Minutes. It’s almost as if the man had a crystal ball, peering into the dystopia of today’s world.

I think this kind of dictatorship of the future will be very unlike the dictatorships which we’ve been familiar with in the immediate past. I mean, take another book prophesying the future, which was a very remarkable book, George Orwell’s “1984.”

Well, this book was written at the height of the Stalinist regime, and just after the Hitler regime, and there he foresaw a dictatorship using entirely the methods of terror, the methods of physical violence. Now, I think what is going to happen in the future is that dictators will find, as the old saying goes, that you can do everything with bayonets except sit on them!

But, if you want to preserve your power indefinitely, you have to get the consent of the ruled, and this they will do partly by drugs as I foresaw in “Brave New World,” partly by these new techniques of propaganda.

They will do it by bypassing the sort of rational side of man and appealing to his subconscious and his deeper emotions, and his physiology even, and so, making him actually love his slavery.

I mean, I think, this is the danger that actually people may be, in some ways, happy under the new regime, but that they will be happy in situations where they oughtn’t to be happy.

As the tyranny men crossed an ocean to run away from grows back with a vengeance, most Americans (especially conservatives) are able to delude themselves into thinking “It can’t happen here.” It is happening here, fools.

Indeed, the flag-wavers who love their freedom as long as it isn’t breaking the countless laws that have been passed to control them (what a contradiction!) actually love their slavery. Someone might ask these men what freedoms do they have that aren’t taxed, regulated, or straight up illegal?

Which leaves us here, with yet more sage wisdom from the prophetic author.

That men do not learn very much from the lessons of history is the most important of all the lessons that history has to teach.

Huxley knew that men never collectively learn from history despite all their posturing. Only a small minority of men will ever be able to see what history has to teach, and know what might happen in the future by learning from the past. These men will always be vilified and mocked by the masses, until the truth they’re trying to elucidate becomes self-evident.

It’s as if the learned man can do nothing except watch himself being dragged into hell with the masses, as the world descends into tyranny once again.

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George Carlin – Fuck Hope

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George Carlin, the ultimate cynical realist

George Carlin was twenty years ahead of his time with his comedy routine turned social commentary. Many of the things he would say that were edgy back in the 1990s are pretty mainstream today. Carlin repeatedly proved he was a fearless, freethinking pioneer exposing the The Anglo-American Matrix on stage, in what would later turn into an entire movement towards Red Pill truth seeking once the internet all but replaced the collective mass delusion of television in driving cultural narratives.

While we certainly don’t agree with some of his more left-leaning talking points, he was unbelievably astute as a social commentator. He also saw through the utter ridiculousness of The Political Game and the corrupt American media marketing machine.

This particular commentary of his from his 1997 book Brain Droppings falls in line with the attitude of historian and philosopher Oswald Spengler whose ideas are an integral part of The New Modern Man search for truth about women and the world: Optimism is cowardice. We are neck deep in a pile of shit in the West, and thinking things will get better on their own is the height of delusion.

Here’s Carlin’s entry to the Enlightening Quotes section.

I’m happy to tell you that there’s little in this world that I believe in. Listening to the comedians who comment on political, social, and cultural issues, I notice that most of their material reflects kind of an underlying belief that somehow things were better once, and with just a little effort we could set them right again. They’re looking for solutions and rooting for particular results, and I think that limits the tone and substance of what they say. They’re talented and funny people but they’re really nothing more than cheerleaders attached to a specific wished-for outcome.

I don’t feel so confined.

I frankly don’t give a fuck how it all turns out in this country or anywhere else for that matter. I think the human game was up a long time ago when the high priests and traders took over, and now we’re just playing out the string. And that is of course precisely what I find so amusing! The slow circling of the drain by a once promising species and the sappy ever more desperate belief in this country that there is actually some sort of an ‘American Dream’ which has merely been misplaced.

The decay and disintegration of this culture is astonishingly amusing if you’re emotionally detached from it. And I’ve always viewed it from a safe distance, knowing I don’t belong. Doesn’t include me, it never has. No matter how you care to define it, I do not identify with the local group, planet, species, race, nation, state, religion, party, union, club, association, neighborhood-improvement committee. I have no interest in any of it.

I love and treasure individuals as I meet them, I loathe and despise the groups they identify with and belong to.

So if you hear something in this book that sounds like advocacy of a particular political point of view, please reject the notion. My interest in issues is merely to point out how badly we’re doing, not to suggest a way we might do better.

Don’t confuse me with those who cling to hope. I enjoy describing how things are, I have no interest in how they ought to be. And I certainly have no interest in fixing them. I sincerely believe that if you think there’s a solution, you’re part of the problem.

My motto: Fuck Hope.

P.S. In case you’re wondering, personally I’m a joyful individual, I had a long happy marriage and a close and loving family, my career has turned out better than I ever dreamed, and it continues to expand. I’m a personal optimist, but a skeptic about all else. What may sound to some like anger, is really nothing more than sympathetic contempt. I view my species with a combination of wonder and pity, and I root for its destruction. And please don’t confuse my point of view with cynicism–the real cynics are the ones who tell you everything’s gonna be all right.

And P.P.S., by the way, if by some chance you folks do manage to straighten things out and make everything better, I still don’t wish to be included.

— George Carlin

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10 Red Pill H.L. Mencken Quotes

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Henry Louis Mencken when he wrote for the Baltimore Sun

H.L. Mencken is one of the boldest truth tellers of the 20th century. Therefore, he is held in high regard at The New Modern Man. Mencken was a German-American journalist who is regarded as one of the most influential writers of modern times.

After reading Huckleberry Finn at age 9, Mencken knew he wanted to become a writer. He first worked in his father’s cigar store, which he disliked, before going on to study journalism by correspondence proving that rubber stamps from Ivy League schools have nothing to do with intellectual brilliance. (As an aside, one of the dumbest people I ever met graduated from Notre Dame once again confirming rubber stamps mean nothing.) Mencken then began working at a series of newspapers before founding and editing The American Mercury, a national publication that became very influential on college campuses of the time, before they became infested with liberalism.

He displayed a remarkable ability to sift through the myths that plague all civilizations and uncover truth. Even though there was no concept of Red Pill back then, Mencken had a better grasp of the concepts of mythbusting and truth telling than almost anyone before, or anyone since. Here are 10 quotes from H.L. Mencken which are just a relevant today as they were then.

Truth

The search for truth is nothing new for the awakened man, and writers like Mencken have a firm grasp of truth

The Quotes

1. The first selection is from A Mencken Chrestomathy, a book in which he selected some of his own favorite quotations. He reveals the true function of governments, and how they ultimately cripple men who are strong and self-sufficient.

All government, in its essence, is a conspiracy against the superior man: its one permanent object is to oppress him and cripple him. If it be aristocratic in organization, then it seeks to protect the man who is superior only in law against the man who is superior in fact; if it be democratic, then it seeks to protect the man who is inferior in every way against both. One of its primary functions is to regiment men by force, to make them as much alike as possible and as dependent upon one another as possible, to search out and combat originality among them. All it can see in an original idea is potential change, and hence an invasion of its prerogatives.

2. From his book Prejudices, Mencken talks about the danger a clear-seeing individual poses to the power structure. This quote helps illustrate why tyrannical governments always try to suppress speech, as the U.S. government is now doing after taking a sharp turn towards authoritarianism at the dawn of the 21st century. Red Pill men, and the manosphere, pose dangers to the power structure which is why can expect to be attacked and marginalized as we try to awake other men to the realities of The Matrix.

The most dangerous man to any government is the man who is able to think things out for himself, without regard to the prevailing superstitions and taboos. Almost inevitably he comes to the conclusion that the government he lives under is dishonest, insane and intolerable, and so, if he is romantic, he tries to change it. And even if he is not romantic personally he is very apt to spread discontent among those who are.

3. As with many thinkers of his time, Mencken saw the slide of the form of government in the U.S. from a Constitutional Republic to a Democracy as a threat to the principles the nation was supposed to be founded on. From Notes on Democracy:

Democracy is a pathetic belief in the collective wisdom of individual ignorance. No one in this world, so far as I know—and I have researched the records for years, and employed agents to help me—has ever lost money by underestimating the intelligence of the great masses of the plain people. Nor has anyone ever lost public office thereby.

4. The next quote is a fantastic insight, illustrating the mentality of who criticize the degenerate culture and the corrupt government in the United States, only to be demonized by the flag-waving, Team ‘Murica useful idiots. It’s not contempt for Anglo America that drives social and political criticism, it is deep concern over the direction the society is taking that motivates the manosphere.

The notion that a radical is one who hates his country is naïve and usually idiotic. He is, more likely, one who likes his country more than the rest of us, and is thus more disturbed than the rest of us when he sees it debauched. He is not a bad citizen turning to crime; he is a good citizen driven to despair.

5. The next quote parallels the wisdom of Albert Einstein: If you can’t explain something simply, you don’t understand it well enough. This concept is a good idea to keep in mind when debating people who try to muddy the waters by claiming a concept is too complex for the average person to understand.

The best teacher is not the one who knows most but the one who is most capable of reducing knowledge to that simple compound of the obvious and wonderful.

6. We see the next Mencken concept and quote play out quite a lot in modern society. Bertrand Russell called it The Fallacy of the Superior Virtue of the Oppressed. Our species has a tendency to assign moral superiority to those who claim any sort of grievance, especially if it is against the majority. However, Mencken saw right through this façade:

Moral certainty is always a sign of cultural inferiority. The more uncivilized the man, the surer he is that he knows precisely what is right and what is wrong. All human progress, even in morals, has been the work of men who have doubted the current moral values, not of men who have whooped them up and tried to enforce them. The truly civilized man is always skeptical and tolerant, in this field as in all others. His culture is based on “I am not too sure.”

7. Mencken saw the real reasons motivating leaders and nations to go to war, and the desire to keep the populace afraid so as to make them malleable to commands from the government hierarchy. His words are prophetic in that they illustrate the machinery today’s military-industrial complex, and the never-ending, increasingly shady and suspicious American War on Terror that resulted after 9/11.

Civilization, in fact, grows more maudlin and hysterical; especially under democracy it tends to degenerate into a mere combat of crazes; the whole aim of practical politics is to keep the populace alarmed (and hence clamorous to be led to safety) by an endless series of hobgoblins, most of them imaginary. Wars are no longer waged by the will of superior men, capable of judging dispassionately and intelligently the causes behind them and the effects flowing out of them. The are now begun by first throwing a mob into a panic; they are ended only when it has spent its ferine fury.

8. In the modern age, education is the buzzword of politicians and the lemmings in the mainstream media but the reality is a degree has become less of a symbol of education and more of a tool of enslavement. The average college graduate walks away with $30,000 in non-banktruptable debt, which helps keep them nice and pliable when under the heel of their future employer. Today’s public education system conforms to the ideals discussed below by Mencken, of creating a dependent nation of sheeple.

The most erroneous assumption is to the effect that the aim of public education is to fill the young of the species with knowledge and awaken their intelligence, and so make them fit to discharge the duties of citizenship in an enlightened and independent manner. Nothing could be further from the truth. The aim of public education is not to spread enlightenment at all; it is simply to reduce as many individuals as possible to the same safe level, to breed and train a standardized citizenry, to put down dissent and originality. That is its aim in the United States, whatever the pretensions of politicians, pedagogues and other such mountebanks, and that is its aim everywhere else.

9. And of course, politicians were the same corrupt, often psychopathic lowlifes back then that they are now. Only today they have a lot more power to micromanage our lives as men have been de-balled by 50 years of feminism and social engineering us. Government promises effectively amount to nothing more than robbing from the producers to give to the dependent class.

Every election is a sort of advance auction sale of stolen goods.

10. Of course, as Puritanism is deeply embedded in Anglo American culture, its influence is such that the belief sexual repression, working to the point of obsession, and abstinence from any sort of pleasure are nobler pursuits than those of other, more libertine cultures. Of this, Mencken wrote:

Puritanism is the haunting fear that someone, somewhere, may be happy.

Anglo American Puritanism is an interesting study in and of itself, and still has a massive amount of influence over cultural practices in North America.

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Good reads like Mencken are illuminating and relieving in knowing other men have dealt with the same pathologies in society

Enlightening Palliatives

Mencken is one of those rare authors who helps illuminate the mind of the Red Pill man to his plight, and the plight of his society. Reading his cynical but honest work also helps alleviate some of the pain felt by the awakened man to know the insanity of our time did not just appear out of the blue; the pathologies of man have been ongoing for a long time. However, they show no signs of being corrected, and indeed have worsened, especially in our modern age when the weaknesses of the herd are treated as strings to be pulled by an elite.

Unfortunately, Menken’s insights also show us intellectual prowess is no promise that reason will ever be heard by the masses or the often psychopathic shepherds that guide them. It is cathartic, however, to write these realizations down in hopes that someday, some shred of this knowledge will be recognized and appreciated by posterity. For that, we give gratitude to men like H.L. Mencken providing philosophical guidance to the truth-seeking individual.

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10 Philosophical Quotes By Oswald Spengler

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Oswald Spengler, prophet of Western decline

The New Modern Man | Spengler’s Decline of the West Series

Oswald Spengler and his seminal work Decline of the West is a perennial favorite at The New Modern Man. More than perhaps any other philosophical work, it provides perspective on where we are and where we are headed to in life and society.

These 10 selected quotes from Spengler have been prescient to say the least. They are as relevant now as they were when they were published a century ago. Spengler’s study of past high cultures’ rise then decline and how our own relates to them yielded Decline of the West, Man and Technics, and Aphorisms.

His civilization model has given us astonishingly accurate predictions, not only foreseeing the current malaise and decline of Western civilization, but given us a philosophy that doesn’t just contradict the liberal, linear model of history, it destroys it.

Spengler deserves more attention than he receives from the current education system. Here are 10 of his best quotes as selected by The New Modern Man:

1. The Common Man

The common man wants nothing of life but health, longevity, amusement, comfort – “happiness.” He who does not despise this should turn his eyes from world history, for it contains nothing of the sort. The best that history has created is great suffering.

2. Democracy

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“Through money, democracy becomes its own destroyer, after money has destroyed intellect.” -Oswald Spengler

3. The Media

Today we live so cowed under the bombardment of this intellectual artillery (the media) that hardly anyone can attain to the inward detachment that is required for a clear view of the monstrous drama. The will-to-power operating under a pure democratic disguise has finished off its masterpiece so well that the object’s sense of freedom is actually flattered by the most thorough-going enslavement that has ever existed.

4. World Peace and the Liberal Utopia

The question of whether world peace will ever be possible can only be answered by someone familiar with world history. To be familiar with world history means, however, to know human beings as they have been and always will be. There is a vast difference, which most people will never comprehend, between viewing future history as it will be and viewing it as one might like it to be. Peace is a desire, war is a fact; and history has never paid heed to human desires and ideals…

5. The Real Motivation of Socialist and Communists

There is no proletarian, not even a Communist movement, that has not operated in the interests of money, and for the time being permitted by money – and that without the idealists among its leaders having the slightest suspicion of the fact.

6. Destiny

We are born into this time and must bravely follow the path to the destined end. There is no other way. Our duty is to hold on to the lost position, without hope, without rescue, like that Roman soldier whose bones were found in front of a door in Pompeii, who, during the eruption of Vesuvius, died at his post because they forgot to relieve him. That is greatness. That is what it means to be a thoroughbred. The honorable end is the one thing that can not be taken from a man.

7. The Death of Art

One day the last portrait of Rembrandt and the last bar of Mozart will have ceased to be — though possibly a colored canvas and a sheet of notes will remain — because the last eye and the last ear accessible to their message will have gone.

8. Liberalism Vs. Conservatism

For the Age has itself become vulgar, and most people have no idea to what extent they are themselves tainted. The bad manners of all parliaments, the general tendency to connive at a rather shady business transaction if it promises to bring in money without work, jazz and Negro dances as the spiritual outlet in all circles of society, women painted like prostitutes, the efforts of writers to win popularity by ridiculing in their novels and plays the correctness of well-bred people, and the bad taste shown even by the nobility and old princely families in throwing off every kind of social restraint and time-honoured custom: all of these go to prove that it is now the vulgar mob that gives the tone.

9. The City Cannibalizing the Countryside

Long ago the country bore the country-town and nourished it with her best blood. Now the giant city sucks the country dry, insatiably and incessantly demanding and devouring fresh streams of men, till it wearies and dies in the midst of an almost uninhabited waste of country.

10. What History Tells Us

World-history is the history of the great Cultures, and peoples are but the symbolic forms and vessels in which the men of these Cultures fulfil their Destinies.

Some call his world views pessimistic. To his detractors, Spengler only had this to say:

Man was, and is, too shallow and cowardly to endure the fact of the mortality of everything living. He wraps it up in rose-colored progress-optimism, he heaps upon it the flowers of literature, he crawls behind the shelter of ideals so as not to see anything. But impermanence, the birth and the passing, is the form of all that is actual — from the stars, whose destiny is for us incalculable, right down to the ephemeral concourses on our planet. The life of the individual – whether this be animal or plant or man – is as perishable as that of peoples of Cultures. Every creation is foredoomed to decay, every thought, every discovery, every deed to oblivion. Here, there, and everywhere we are sensible of grandly fated courses of history that have vanished. Ruins of the “have-been” works of dead Cultures lie all about us. The hubris of Prometheus, who thrust his hand into the heavens in order to make the divine powers subject to man, carries with it his fall. What, then, becomes of the chatter about undying achievements?

However, rather than become totally fatalistic, Spengler offers this advice for living the best life we can given the circumstances presented to us that our out of our control.

This is our purpose: to make as meaningful as possible this life that has been bestowed upon us…to live in such a way that we may be proud of ourselves, to act in such a way that some part of us lives on. This is our purpose: to make as meaningful as possible this life that has been bestowed upon us…to live in such a way that we may be proud of ourselves, to act in such a way that some part of us lives on.

A life we can be proud of when the end comes is a noble desire, indeed. Facing the circumstances we are actually in, not what we would like them to be, is the essence of masculinity and allows us to plan our lives accordingly instead of living under a Niebuhr-esque trance foisted upon us by the mythmakers. As Spengler put it, “Optimism is cowardice.”

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